Sample Chapter

 

INSTANT DOWNLOAD COMPLETE TEST BANK WITH ANSWERS

 

 

Test Bank For America A Narrative History Volume 1, 10th Edition by David E. Shi , George Brown Tindall

 

 

 

SAMPLE QUESTIONS

 

CHAPTER 03: COLONIAL WAYS OF LIFE

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. England transported more than 50,000 convicts to the North American colonies for settlement.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 110

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   Population Growth (I.A)

 

  1. In the New World, people were generally safe from disease and epidemics.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 111

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   Population Growth (I.A)

 

  1. Most colonists strongly believed in the inferiority of women.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 112

OBJ:   Examine the roles of women in English colonial society.          TOP:    Women in the Colonies (I.B)

 

  1. In British North America, black men and women were often excluded from religious services out of the belief that Christianized slaves might seek to gain freedom.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 115

OBJ:   Examine the roles of women in English colonial society.          TOP:    Women and Religion (I.D)

 

  1. The most important crop in the Virginia colony was tobacco.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 116

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   Society and Economy in the Southern Colonies (II)

 

  1. By 1700, tobacco, rice, and indigo were the most important export crops of Maryland, Virginia, and the Carolinas.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 116

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   Society and Economy in the Southern Colonies (II)

 

  1. New Englanders, more than southerners, turned to the sea for their livelihood.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 119

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   The New England Economy (III.C)

 

  1. Belief in witchcraft was widespread throughout Europe in the seventeenth century.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 122

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   The Devil in New England (III.F)

 

  1. In 1691–1692, mass hysteria struck the town of Salem, Massachusetts, in the form of an outbreak of alleged witchcraft.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 122

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   The Devil in New England (III.F)

 

  1. The colony of Pennsylvania was one of the most diverse in English North America, with English, German, Scots-Irish, and a variety of smaller national and ethnic groups represented.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 124

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   An Ethnic Mix (IV.B)

 

  1. Initially, in the early seventeenth century, many of the first slaves were treated like indentured servants and earned their freedom.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 127

OBJ:   Explain how race-based slavery developed during the seventeenth century and the ways it impacted the social and economic development of colonial America.

TOP:   Race-Based Slavery (V)

 

  1. During the eighteenth century, demand for slaves in the southern colonies declined slightly.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 129

OBJ:   Explain how race-based slavery developed during the seventeenth century and the ways it impacted the social and economic development of colonial America.

TOP:   The Market in Slaves (V.C)

 

  1. Because traveling at night was dangerous in the colonies, taverns became important during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 132

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   The Urban Web (VI.B)

 

  1. Jonathan Edwards saw emotionalism as a weakness among Christians.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 139

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   Jonathan Edwards (VIII.B)

 

  1. George Whitefield was a great preacher who impressed even Benjamin Franklin with his eloquence.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 140

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   George Whitefield (VIII.C)

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Which of the following was an advantage for women in North America regarding an expanding population?
a. Colonists married and started families earlier in Europe.
b. Women often had a child every two or three years before menopause.
c. Diseases and epidemics ran rampant.
d. Miscarriages were uncommon.
e. Infant mortality rates were uniformly low.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 110

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   Population Growth (I.A)

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Benjamin Franklin believed a major reason for colonial population growth was:
a. government bounties for large families
b. English immunity to contagious diseases
c. rapid advances in medical science
d. couples marrying later than in Europe
e. an abundance of cheap land

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 110

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   Population Growth (I.A)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Although diseases were widespread in North America, colonists were less susceptible because:
a. of the dispersed nature of the American population
b. Americans had been exposed to most diseases in Europe and had built immunity
c. the colonies had much better doctors than England
d. the diseases themselves were not as virulent as their European cousins
e. American cities were cleaner than their European counterparts

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 111

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   Population Growth (I.A)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Throughout the colonies, husbands expected what from their wives?
a. submission to their authority
b. an equal partnership in managing the household
c. instruction in religion and morality
d. romantic love as the basis of marriage
e. toleration of sex outside of marriage

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 112

OBJ:   Examine the roles of women in English colonial society.          TOP:    Women in the Colonies (I.B)

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which of the following statements about women’s labor is NOT true?
a. Unmarried women often worked outside the home.
b. Women often did piecemeal work like spinning thread into yarn.
c. Women were not expected to work in highly skilled occupations.
d. Farm women had a very diverse realm of responsibilities.
e. Marriage usually isolated women to their own homes and gardens.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Pages 112-113

OBJ:   Examine the roles of women in English colonial society.          TOP:    “Women’s Work” (I.C)

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Women in the American colonies:
a. generally had lower status in society than did women in Europe
b. often remained confined to the domestic sphere
c. could vote and hold office
d. were not likely to find eligible men to marry
e. lived lives of quiet and leisure

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 114

OBJ:   Examine the roles of women in English colonial society.          TOP:    “Women’s Work” (I.C)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. During the colonial period, prostitution:
a. was practically unknown
b. was legal in most cities and states
c. was especially common in port cities
d. resulted in equal punishment for men and women
e. was one of the few occupations open to women

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 114

OBJ:   Examine the roles of women in English colonial society.          TOP:    “Women’s Work” (I.C)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Eliza Pinckney could be called a modern woman living in the colonial world for the following reasons EXCEPT:
a. she managed three plantations
b. she was a dedicated wife and mother
c. she occupied a supervisory role over her male counterparts
d. she managed her family affairs in addition to her other responsibilities
e. she cultivated indigo as a very lucrative cash crop

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 114

OBJ:   Examine the roles of women in English colonial society.          TOP:    “Women’s Work” (I.C)

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. In regard to religion, women:
a. frequently served as ministers
b. were more likely to be churchgoers than men
c. experienced more equality in Puritan churches
d. were more likely than men to question religious authority
e. were frequently employed as faith healers

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 115

OBJ:   Examine the roles of women in English colonial society.          TOP:    Women and Religion (I.D)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. In the seventeenth century, the cash crop that was the basis of the economy in Virginia and Maryland was:
a. rice d. cotton
b. tobacco e. barley
c. indigo

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 116

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   Society and Economy in the Southern Colonies (II)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The success of rice as a perfect crop for South Carolina was helped by:
a. plentiful labor and land in the colony
b. the native population’s willingness to work in the fields
c. the minimal amount of labor it required
d. the creation of irrigation systems that allowed laborers to flood and drain the fields
e. the lack of rain in the region

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 116

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   Society and Economy in the Southern Colonies (II)

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Which of the following statements about early colonial life in the Chesapeake region is true?
a. Settlers lived in very primitive houses.
b. Colonists were devoutly religious.
c. Men and women had very large families.
d. Indians tended to ignore and avoid English communities.
e. Settlers lived in small but ornate houses.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 116

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   Society and Economy in the Southern Colonies (II)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Which of the following was true of New England in the seventeenth century?
a. Residents were required to be members of the Puritan church.
b. Residents were intensely loyal to the wishes of the king and Parliament.
c. Church and state were separated in all New England colonies.
d. Considerable cultural and racial open-mindedness was practiced.
e. It was more governed by religious concerns than the middle and southern colonies.

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 117

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   Society and Economy in New England (III)

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Early settlers of Puritan New England typically lived:
a. in harmony with the local Indian tribes
b. in communities loyal to the Church of England
c. on large farms
d. in a religiously tolerant society
e. in communities where church and state were not separate

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 118

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   Townships (III.A)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The covenant theory from which the Puritans drew their ideas contained:
a. the justification for New England’s strict theocracy
b. the notion that the king replaced God as the head of the government of the people
c. the notion that men were capable of governing themselves well because they had been absolved of all sin when they entered the church
d. a fundamental belief in democracy
e. certain kernels of democracy in both church and state

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 118

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   Townships (III.A)

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT true of New England home life?
a. New Englanders lived in plain and sturdy dwellings.
b. Most people went to bed at dark regardless of the season.
c. The “chair man” sat at the head of the table at dinner.
d. Family life was centered around the main room with a fireplace.
e. Most New Englanders had well-appointed homes with glass windows.

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 119

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   Dwellings and Daily Life (III.B)

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. New England’s most important commodity was:
a. corn d. turkeys
b. molasses e. rum
c. fish

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 119

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   The New England Economy (III.C)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Which of the following spurred shipbuilding in New England?
a. the abundance of fish and whales off its coast
b. the region’s extensive forests
c. the growing American navy
d. the need for transporting southern cotton
e. southern purchases of New England–made ships

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 120

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   Shipbuilding (III.D)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. New England was settled by:
a. a joint-stock company d. the king and his family
b. religious fundamentalists e. ex-convicts and debtors
c. military officers

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 121

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   The Devil in New England (III.F)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The witch craze in Salem started when:
a. a slave named Tituba cursed the village minister
b. Indians attacked and looted the village
c. several people died of a mysterious illness
d. adolescent girls began to exhibit strange afflictions
e. the town minister was caught in a sex scandal

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 122

OBJ:   Examine the roles of women in English colonial society.

TOP:   The Devil in New England (III.F)   MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The best explanation for the Salem witch craze is:
a. the playacting and false accusations of teenage girls
b. the presence of real witches in Salem Village
c. social division and anxieties within the village
d. the low rate of literacy among the villagers
e. natural hallucinogens in the local water supply

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 123

OBJ:   Examine the roles of women in English colonial society.

TOP:   The Devil in New England (III.F)   MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The middle colonies:
a. included Rhode Island and Maryland
b. lacked a suitable base for commerce
c. for many years had a black-majority population
d. were dominated by plantation agriculture
e. geographically and culturally stood between the New England and southern colonies.

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 123

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   Society and Economy in the Middle Colonies (IV)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Which of the following terms related to land policy in New York?
a. patroonship d. plantation tracts
b. headright e. Dutch Estates
c. royal grants

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 124

OBJ:   Analyze the differences and similarities between the societies and economies of the southern, middle, and New England colonies.     TOP:   An Economic Mix (IV.A)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The largest number of German immigrants to the colonies settled in:
a. Rhode Island d. Delaware
b. South Carolina e. Pennsylvania
c. New York

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 124

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   An Ethnic Mix (IV.B)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Of the following colonies, which one most embraced religious and ethnic diversity?
a. New York d. Virginia
b. Massachusetts e. Maryland
c. Pennsylvania

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 124

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   An Ethnic Mix (IV.B)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Which of the following was NOT a major immigrant group to Pennsylvania?
a. Puritans d. Germans
b. Mennonites e. Quakers
c. Scots-Irish

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 124

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   An Ethnic Mix (IV.B)

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Slave codes:
a. helped potential runaways plan their escapes
b. outlined the local laws that governed slave life and ownership
c. were universal rules that applied to all slave owners regardless of colony
d. outlined the kinds of work slaves could do in certain geographic areas
e. guaranteed slaves the right to worship weekly

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 127

OBJ:   Explain how race-based slavery developed during the seventeenth century and the ways it impacted the social and economic development of colonial America.

TOP:   Race-Based Slavery (V)                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Legally speaking, slaves were:
a. contracted workers d. necessary for economic success
b. property e. largely Christian
c. unfree laborers

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 128

OBJ:   Explain how race-based slavery developed during the seventeenth century and the ways it impacted the social and economic development of colonial America.

TOP:   Colonial Slavery (V.B)                   MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Which is NOT true of early colonial slavery?
a. Far more slaves went to the West Indies than to North America.
b. Slavery was present in all the English colonies.
c. Slaves had higher survival rates in North America than in the West Indies.
d. No colony had a majority-slave population.
e. All slaves could expect a lifetime in bondage.

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 128

OBJ:   Explain how race-based slavery developed during the seventeenth century and the ways it impacted the social and economic development of colonial America.

TOP:   Colonial Slavery (V.B)                   MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. The Stono Rebellion:
a. took place in Virginia
b. was the only successful slave revolt of the colonial era
c. was incited by a law forcing Christianity on slaves
d. came about as a result of Spanish interference
e. tightened controls on slaves

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 129

OBJ:   Explain how race-based slavery developed during the seventeenth century and the ways it impacted the social and economic development of colonial America.

TOP:   Slave Abuse and Resistance (V.D) MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Slaves who lived in northern colonies:
a. usually lived and worked in cities and towns
b. were agricultural laborers like those in the South
c. enjoyed more humane treatment than those in the Chesapeake
d. usually possessed a trade or special skill
e. were forced to become Puritans

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 130

OBJ:   Explain how race-based slavery developed during the seventeenth century and the ways it impacted the social and economic development of colonial America.

TOP:   Slavery in New York City (V.E)     MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The events surrounding a suspected slave revolt in New York City in 1741 offer parallels to:
a. the English Civil War d. Bacon’s Rebellion
b. the Salem witch craze e. the Great Awakening
c. the American Revolution

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Pages 130-131

OBJ:   Explain how race-based slavery developed during the seventeenth century and the ways it impacted the social and economic development of colonial America.

TOP:   Slavery in New York City (V.E)     MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. The largest city in the colonies at the end of the colonial period:
a. had a population of about 1 million
b. had a population of about 2,000
c. was Boston
d. was Philadelphia
e. had as many people as London

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 131

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   Colonial Cities (VI)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. By the end of the colonial period, American cities:
a. were limited to the middle colonies
b. were characterized by increasing social and economic equality
c. held no more than 10 percent of the total population
d. were cleaner, safer, and healthier than rural environments
e. had majority-non-English populations

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 131

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   Colonial Cities (VI)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. By 1700, the most democratic and important social institutions were:
a. coffee houses d. colleges
b. churches e. taverns
c. theaters

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 133

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   The Urban Web (VI.B)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. John Peter Zenger’s trial in 1735 established:
a. that truth is a defense in libel cases
b. absolute freedom of the press
c. private ownership of newspapers
d. the right to send newspapers through the mail
e. the legal difference between libel and slander

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 134

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   The Urban Web (VI.B)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Enlightenment thinkers such as Isaac Newton stressed the:
a. value of traditional religion
b. virtue of divine right monarchy
c. ability of reason to discover the laws of the universe
d. superiority of art over science
e. presence of God in nature

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 135

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   The Age of Reason (VII.A)            MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Benjamin Franklin emphasized the Enlightenment in his:
a. denial of God’s existence
b. rise from poverty to riches
c. passion for science and experimentation
d. scandalous sex life
e. work as a printer and publisher

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 136

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   The American Enlightenment (VII.B)                              MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Education in the colonies was:
a. most advanced in the South
b. primarily intended for young women
c. most advanced in frontier regions
d. hampered in New England by the Puritans’ anti-intellectual tradition
e. usually seen as the responsibility of family and church

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 136

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   Education in the Colonies (VII.C)

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Puritan commitment to education is best explained by their:
a. need for a literate workforce
b. commitment to Enlightenment principles
c. prior exposure to schools in England
d. innate love of learning
e. need to read the Scriptures

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 136

OBJ:   Discuss the major factors that contributed to the demographic changes in the English colonies during the eighteenth century.   TOP:   Education in the Colonies (VII.C)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The Great Awakening developed in reaction to the:
a. attempt of British officials to regulate colonial churches
b. increasing education and sophistication of backwoods settlers
c. increasing role of emotionalism in religion
d. tendency of the Enlightenment to place great emphasis on formal religion
e. Deism and skepticism associated with the Enlightenment

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 137

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   The Great Awakening (VIII)           MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Which church dominated the Chesapeake region by 1700?
a. Anglican d. Baptist
b. Quaker e. Presbyterian
c. Puritan

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 137

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   The Great Awakening (VIII)           MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The religious revivals known as the Great Awakening did all the following EXCEPT:
a. affect all thirteen colonies
b. split a number of churches
c. feature traveling ministers
d. emphasize an emotional style of preaching
e. further promote Enlightenment thinking

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Pages 137-138

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   The Great Awakening (VIII)           MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Jonathan Edwards’s famous sermon, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” described:
a. a distant and uncaring God
b. the gruesome reality of hell
c. the beauty of God’s creation
d. the possibility of universal salvation
e. God’s desire that Americans economically prosper

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 139

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   Jonathan Edwards (VIII.B)             MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The English revivalist who preached to thousands and so impressed Benjamin Franklin was:
a. James Davenport d. George Whitefield
b. Jonathan Edwards e. William Tennent
c. Evander Osteen

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 140

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   George Whitefield (VIII.C)             MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The Tennents did all of the following EXCEPT:
a. called old line ministers “cold and sapless”
b. urged people to renounce their ministers and pursue salvation on their own
c. were disciples of Jonathan Edwards and George Whitefield
d. considered the gathering of wealth to be acceptable for Christians
e. urged parishioners to change their condition through political activity

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 140

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   Radical Evangelists (VIII.D)           MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. One of the most controversial elements of the Great Awakening was:
a. women who rose to speak during religious services
b. the revolutionary approach of the New Light theology
c. the democratizing of religion through revivalism
d. the acceptance of confrontation as an element of worship
e. the fearsome imagery of many of the sermons

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 141

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   Women and Revivals (VIII.E)        MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. New Lights differed from Old Lights by:
a. their readiness to approach their religious conflict as open warfare
b. discounting the element of choice in a person’s faith
c. including elements like choir in church services
d. incorporating democracy and emotionalism into faith
e. promising to reinforce traditional Puritanism

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Pages 141-142

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   A Changing Religious Landscape (VIII.F)                       MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. One result of the Great Awakening was that it spurred an increase in the number of:
a. slave rebellions d. witch crazes
b. suicides e. colleges
c. marriages

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 142

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   Religious Colleges (VIII.G)            MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Which of the following institutions was NOT created as a result of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century religious developments?
a. University of Virginia d. Yale College
b. College of William and Mary e. College of New Jersey
c. Harvard College

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 142

OBJ:   Identify how the Enlightenment and Great Awakening influenced American thought.

TOP:   Religious Colleges (VIII.G)            MSC:  Evaluating

 

ESSAY

 

  1. In what ways did settlement patterns, family life, population growth, and so forth differ in the New England and southern colonies in the seventeenth century? What factors might account for these differences?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Compare and contrast the way Englishmen and Indians used the land in colonial New England.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Describe the early development of slavery in the American colonies.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Describe the status of women in colonial society. What factors might account for this?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Examine mortality in the colonial era, making sure to note age, gender, and geographic considerations.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. We often think about the colonial period as filled with religion and therefore filled with morality. With this in mind, discuss the immorality of the age.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. During the seventeenth century, race-based slavery was very important in the New World. Discuss the concept of blackness and how Europeans used it to justify their enslavement of Africans.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Seventeenth-century slavery was unique in world history for its color basis. Examine the nature of this institution at that time, making sure to speak to the economic forces that drove it.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Which had the most far-reaching consequences on American culture: the Enlightenment or the Great Awakening? Why?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. According to the textbook, “Both geographically and culturally, the middle colonies stood between New England and the South.” Explain this statement.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Describe the ecology of the Atlantic Seaboard. Be sure to detail the various factors that shaped America’s ecosystems.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Discuss the unique nature of colonial cities. Focus your emphasis on the social and political order as well as the urban web.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Explain the system of education in the colonies. Which groups had the greatest impact on expanding educational opportunities to colonial citizens?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Discuss the New England shipping industry and its impact on colonial trade.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Describe both American society and the economy of the middle colonies.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

MATCHING

 

Match each description with the item below.

a. gave the sermon, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”
b. urged people to pursue salvation without ministers
c. urged his parishioners to experience a “new birth”
d. challenged biblical notions through science
e. former slave who became a major Virginia landowner
f. author of the Pennsylvania Gazette and Poor Richard’s Almanack
g. was a newspaper editor tried for libel
h. developed indigo as an exotic staple
i. advocate of “natural law” and “natural rights”
j. confessed to witchcraft in Salem

 

 

  1. CHAPTER 11: THE SOUTH, SLAVERY, AND KING COTTON, 1800-1860TRUE/FALSE

     

    1. One of the most realistic depictions of the Old South comes from the classic film Gone with the Wind.

     

    ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 464

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   The Distinctiveness of the Old South (I)

     

    1. The percentage of the native-born population in the South was high in comparison to other parts of the country.

     

    ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 467

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   A Biracial Culture (I.A)

     

    1. The Old South was a socially, culturally, and economically unified region of the United States.

     

    ANS:  F                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 468

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   Many Souths (I.C)

     

    1. Tobacco was the first major cash crop of the South.

     

    ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 469

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              The Cotton Kingdom (II)

     

    1. Agricultural diversity in the Old South was practically nonexistent.

     

    ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Pages 469-470

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              The Cotton Kingdom (II)

     

    1. Falling crop prices and soil exhaustion spurred many residents from the Carolinas and Virginia to migrate to the Old Southwest.

     

    ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 471

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              The Old Southwest (II.B)

     

    1. Men on the southern frontier generally avoided alcohol, gambling, or fighting.

     

    ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 473

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   The Southern Frontier (II.C)

     

    1. The large-scale slaveholding planter class made up only a very small portion of the overall southern society.

     

    ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 476

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              White Planters (III.A)

     

    1. A black overseer on a plantation was known as a driver.

     

    ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 480

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              Overseers and Drivers (III.C)

     

    1. Visitors to the South often had a hard time telling poor whites apart from small farmers.

     

    ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 481

    OBJ:   Recognize the events that led to the anti-slavery movement and examine how white southerners responded to it.           TOP:              “Poor Whites” (III.E)

     

    1. The slave population in the South showed no significant growth between 1790 and 1830.

     

    ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 482

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              Black Society in the South (IV)

     

    1. Free blacks were usually wealthy and highly educated.

     

    ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Pages 483-484

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   “Free Persons of Color” (IV.B)

     

    1. The operation of the domestic slave trade often meant separating families from each other.

     

    ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 485 | Page 488

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   The Trade in Slaves (IV.C)

     

    1. The South was overwhelmingly Catholic.

     

    ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 494

    OBJ:   Recognize the events that led to the anti-slavery movement and examine how white southerners responded to it.           TOP:              Religion in the Old South (V.B)

     

    1. Denmark Vesey plotted a slave insurrection in Charleston, South Carolina.

     

    ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 498

    OBJ:   Recognize the events that led to the anti-slavery movement and examine how white southerners responded to it.           TOP:              Denmark Vesey (V.H)

     

    MULTIPLE CHOICE

     

    1. The movie Gone with the Wind:
    a. realistically portrays slavery
    b. mirrors the portrayal of the South in Uncle Tom’s Cabin
    c. presents a mythic view of the Old South
    d. has little remaining influence in our culture
    e. offended white southerners at the time of its release

     

     

    ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 464

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              The Distinctiveness of the Old South (I)

    MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. The development of southern industry:
    a. lagged behind the North
    b. was more significant than agriculture to the southern economy
    c. was the only sector of the southern economy that did not rely on slaves
    d. turned the North into a colonial dependency of the more developed South
    e. was nonexistent before the Civil War

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 466

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   The Distinctiveness of the Old South (I)                         MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. All the following might be used to explain the South’s distinctiveness EXCEPT:
    a. its climate
    b. its preponderance of farming
    c. its biracial population
    d. the high proportion of immigrants that comprised the overall southern population
    e. its determination to preserve slavery

     

     

    ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 467

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              A Biracial Culture (I.A)

    MSC:  Evaluating

     

    1. The South’s population:
    a. was more ethnically diverse than any other area in the country
    b. had more immigrants from Germany than from any other country after the Revolution
    c. declined significantly after the Revolution
    d. had a high proportion of native-born, both black and white
    e. was racially unified due to the region’s ban on all immigration

     

     

    ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 467

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              A Biracial Culture (I.A)

    MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. Which of the following was NOT part of the myth of the Old South’s superiority?
    a. The standard of living in northern states had declined since slavery had been banned.
    b. Kind planters indulged their happy slaves.
    c. Slavery was beneficial to both the master and slave.
    d. The South was morally superior to the North.
    e. One southerner could defeat ten northerners in combat.

     

     

    ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 467

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              Conflicting Myths (I.B)

    MSC:  Evaluating

     

    1. By 1860, slavery was most concentrated:
    a. in the Lower South d. in Texas and Louisiana
    b. in the Carolinas e. equally through the South
    c. in the Upper South

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 468

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              Many Souths (I.C)

    MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. By the antebellum period, all of the following remained significant cash crops in the South EXCEPT:
    a. cotton d. tobacco
    b. sugar e. indigo
    c. rice

     

     

    ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Pages 469-470

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   The Cotton Kingdom (II)                MSC:  Evaluating

     

    1. The focus on cotton and other cash crops has obscured the degree to which:
    a. the antebellum South fed itself from its own fields
    b. the South became totally dependent on the West for its food
    c. the South relied on Britain for its manufactured goods
    d. the North had to use imported cotton from overseas for its textile manufacturers
    e. most white southerners lived and worked in cities

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 470

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   The Cotton Kingdom (II)                MSC:  Analyzing

     

    1. During the first half of the nineteenth century, cotton became the most profitable form of agriculture, surpassing:
    a. swine d. tobacco
    b. rice e. hemp
    c. indigo

     

     

    ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 470

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              King Cotton (II.A)

    MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. In the antebellum period, which of the following was in the Old Southwest?
    a. Virginia d. Georgia
    b. North Carolina e. South Carolina
    c. Mississippi

     

     

    ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 471

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              The Old Southwest (II.B)

    MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. The Old Southwest:
    a. included Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah
    b. attracted thousands of settlers in the 1820s and 1830s with its low land prices and suitability for cotton production
    c. attracted nearly twice as many female as male settlers in the early years
    d. soon boasted the nation’s highest standards of public education
    e. was a promised land for slaves because of superior work conditions

     

     

    ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 471

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              The Old Southwest (II.B)

    MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. Life in the Old Southwest was characterized by:
    a. a lack of women d. pacifism
    b. pleasant working conditions e. opposition to slavery
    c. prohibition of alcohol

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 472

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              The Southern Frontier (II.C)

    MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. Slaves forced to migrate to the Old Southwest were particularly despondent over:
    a. the lack of meaningful work that awaited them
    b. the control that women exerted over the region’s culture and society
    c. the absence of alcohol on the frontier
    d. the urban and industrial nature of the region
    e. the breakup of family ties that resulted from the migration

     

     

    ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 474

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   The Southern Frontier (II.C)           MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. Which of the following was not a part of the “masculine” culture of the Old Southwest’s frontier?
    a. violence d. gambling
    b. gender equality e. sexual promiscuity
    c. alcohol use

     

     

    ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 474

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              The Southern Frontier (II.C)

    MSC:  Applying

     

    1. As southerners moved farther west and south between 1812 and 1860:
    a. cotton production soared
    b. the South became less agricultural
    c. the South became less distinctive
    d. fewer slaves were needed
    e. North–South relations got better

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Pages 474-475

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   The Spreading Cotton Kingdom (II.D)                            MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. By 1860, the significance of Britain to the southern economy was based on the fact that:
    a. Britain provided most of the slaves to the South
    b. Britain was the major consumer of southern tobacco
    c. British consumers sparked the growth of the thriving southern indigo trade
    d. Britain had pledged itself to protect the institution of slavery
    e. Britain was a major importer of southern cotton

     

     

    ANS:  E                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 476

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   The Spreading Cotton Kingdom (II.D)                            MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. The rapid expansion of the cotton belt in the South:
    a. reduced the significance of slavery
    b. spurred a rise in the number of enslaved blacks given their freedom
    c. ensured that the region became more dependent on enslaved black workers
    d. increased the responsibilities of field work for the plantation mistress
    e. eliminated the presence of all other staple crops throughout the region

     

     

    ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 475

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   The Spreading Cotton Kingdom (II.D)                            MSC:  Analyzing

     

    1. Most southern men prided themselves on adhering to a moral code based on:
    a. deference to female authority d. the disregard of elders
    b. racial equality e. pacifism
    c. a prickly sense of honor

     

     

    ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 477

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              White Planters (III.A)

    MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. The frequency of dueling in the South was probably caused by:
    a. hot weather that elevated tempers
    b. lack of education of the participants
    c. the absence of police departments
    d. the beauty of southern women
    e. southerners’ exalted sense of honor

     

     

    ANS:  E                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 477

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              White Planters (III.A)

    MSC:  Applying

     

    1. What portion of the South’s white population had no proprietary interest in slaves?
    a. one tenth d. two thirds
    b. one fourth e. three fourths
    c. one half

     

     

    ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 477

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   White Planters (III.A)                                MSC:              Remembering

     

    1. To be called a “planter,” one had to:
    a. own at least twenty slaves d. own thousands of slaves
    b. work alongside slaves e. avoid involvement in politics
    c. be engaged in the slave trade

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 477

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   White Planters (III.A)                                MSC:              Remembering

     

    1. Most slaves in the Lower South:
    a. served as household help
    b. supported the institution of slavery
    c. escaped from their masters at one point
    d. were white
    e. labored on large plantations

     

     

    ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 477

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   White Planters (III.A)                                MSC:              Remembering

     

    1. The plantation mistress:
    a. usually led a life of idle leisure
    b. often criticized the prevailing social order and racist climate
    c. generally confronted a double standard in terms of moral and sexual behavior
    d. was sometimes known as the slave driver
    e. represented the typical southern white woman

     

     

    ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 479

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              The Plantation Mistress (III.B)

    MSC:  Analyzing

     

    1. Plantation mistresses:
    a. tended to oppose slavery
    b. very seldom toiled
    c. were usually college educated
    d. supervised the domestic household
    e. could count on their husbands being faithful

     

     

    ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 478

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              The Plantation Mistress (III.B)

    MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. On a plantation, the position responsible for managing the agricultural production in every way

    was the:

    a. driver d. overseer
    b. slave e. master
    c. field hand

     

     

    ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 480

    OBJ:   Describe the diversity of the Old South’s economy, and identify its unifying feature.

    TOP:   Overseers and Drivers (III.C)         MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. The most numerous white southerners were the:
    a. planters d. manufacturers
    b. yeoman farmers e. overseers
    c. “poor whites”

     

     

    ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 480

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              “Plain White Folk” (III.D)

    MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. Middling farmers in the South:
    a. usually owned slaves
    b. generally supported white supremacy
    c. lived on the verge of starvation
    d. were the lower class of the region
    e. were outnumbered by the planters

     

     

    ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 480

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              “Plain White Folk” (III.D)

    MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. Why were theories of racial superiority significant in the South?
    a. They created a sense of unity that bridged class divisions among most southern whites.
    b. They were primarily adhered to by the planter elite that owned slaves.
    c. They played no role in encouraging white support of slavery.
    d. They were created by slaves to justify their enslavement.
    e. They fostered slave rebellions among slaves who believed in the inferiority of the planter class.

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 481

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              “Plain White Folk” (III.D)

    MSC:  Analyzing

     

    1. Poor whites were often employed as:
    a. day laborers
    b. blacksmiths and other skilled labor positions
    c. slave drivers
    d. teachers
    e. indentured servants

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 481

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              “Poor Whites” (III.E)

    MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. Approximately how many slaves lived in the South in 1860?
    a. 30,000 d. 4 million
    b. 100,000 e. 10 million
    c. 1 million

     

     

    ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 482

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   Black Society in the South (IV)      MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. The rules that governed virtually every aspect of slave life were known as:
    a. paternalism d. slaveocracy
    b. a slave code e. total control
    c. civil law

     

     

    ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 482

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   The Slave System (IV.A)                MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. Free blacks in the South:
    a. sometimes owned slaves d. outnumbered slaves
    b. were always of mixed race e. mostly emigrated to Africa
    c. enjoyed full legal equality

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 483

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   “Free Persons of Color” (IV.B)      MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. Some free blacks were:
    a. eligible to vote
    b. immigrants from the Caribbean
    c. local political leaders
    d. people of mixed ancestry called mulattoes
    e. considered equal to whites

     

     

    ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 483

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   “Free Persons of Color” (IV.B)      MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. All of the following statements about southern free blacks are true EXCEPT:
    a. most were very poor
    b. some were slave owners themselves
    c. there were no women were among them
    d. some owned and operated businesses that served a white clientele
    e. they were still subject to racist legal restrictions not imposed upon whites

     

     

    ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Pages 483-484

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   “Free Persons of Color” (IV.B)      MSC:  Evaluating

     

    1. Slave owners in the antebellum South acquired additional slaves from:
    a. Africa d. the West Indies
    b. Brazil e. Asia
    c. the domestic slave trade

     

     

    ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 484

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   The Trade in Slaves (IV.C)             MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. Which of the following statements was generally true of slave life?
    a. Their lives were very similar from place to place and master to master.
    b. Masters saw the wisdom in feeding their slaves well.
    c. Field hands were organized into work gangs.
    d. Slave mothers saw the overwhelming majority of their children reach adulthood.
    e. Punishments were only meted out when a serious crime warranted them.

     

     

    ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 488

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              Slavery as a Way of Life (IV.D)

    MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. Which of the following was NOT a major motivation for whipping a slave?
    a. illustrating absolute physical control
    b. showing other slaves the penalty for bad behavior and poor habits
    c. as a punishment for a crime
    d. for failing to recognize the moral superiority of the overseer and driver
    e. for failing to meet labor expectations

     

     

    ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 489

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              The Violence of Slavery (IV.E)

    MSC:  Analyzing

     

    1. Slaves living in southern cities had a much different experience from those on farms because:
    a. they were able to interact with an extended interracial community
    b. they held political power
    c. they almost always received a formal education
    d. there were no women slaves in urban areas
    e. only free blacks could own slaves in the city

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 490

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   Urban Slavery (IV.F)                                MSC:              Understanding

     

    1. Why were slave women valued by slave owners?
    a. They exclusively did the household labor.
    b. They had low birth rates due to their oppression.
    c. Their ability to reproduce increased the number of slaves owned.
    d. They were allowed to marry white men.
    e. They were solely responsible for harvesting the fields.

     

     

    ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Pages 490-491

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   Enslaved Women (IV.G)                MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. When in 1855 a slave named Celia killed her sexually abusive master, she was:
    a. acquitted d. sentenced to life in prison
    b. applauded e. hanged
    c. freed

     

     

    ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 492

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   Celia (IV.H)   MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. What was NOT a common way that slaves established their private communities?
    a. openly attempted to organize religious services
    b. told stories about figures like Brer Rabbit who used his wits to survive against overwhelming odds
    c. gathered in secret night meetings where singing and dancing gave them a much needed emotional release
    d. sang religious spirituals that possessed double meanings
    e. embraced religion as a way to spiritually free themselves from their captivity

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 493

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   Forging a Slave Community (V)     MSC:  Evaluating

     

    1. The legal prohibition that denied slaves the right to marry:
    a. prevented slaves from forming families
    b. led to a devaluing of love in the slave community
    c. did not stop slaves from choosing partners and forging a family life
    d. reduced the significance of religion in slave life
    e. did not apply to white mistresses who chose to marry a slave

     

     

    ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 493

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   The Slave Family (V.A)                  MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. By the 1830s, most Baptists and Methodists in the South:
    a. condemned slavery d. were active in reform movements
    b. owned slaves e. defended slavery
    c. were wealthy planters

     

     

    ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 494

    OBJ:   Explain the distinctive culture of the Old South and why even southern whites who did not hold slaves defended the “peculiar institution.”    TOP:              Slavery and Religion (V.C)

    MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. Slave religion:
    a. mixed African and Christian elements
    b. caused slaves to accept their condition
    c. required reading of the Bible
    d. was stamped out by white masters
    e. was best observed during racially integrated church services

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 495

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   African American Religion (V.D)   MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. Approximately how many slaves joined Christian denominations by 1860?
    a. none d. 20 percent
    b. 100 percent e. less than 1 percent
    c. More than half

     

     

    ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 495

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   African American Religion (V.D)   MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. How would southern whites attempt to prevent slave rebellions?
    a. They met any sign of resistance or rebellion with a brutal response.
    b. They tried to ensure slave loyalty through kind treatment and monetary compensation.
    c. They had dark-skinned whites infiltrate and spy on slave communities.
    d. They offered freedom and passage out of the South to the most troublesome slaves.
    e. They taught slaves the value of hard work.

     

     

    ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 496

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   Slave Rebellions (V.E)                   MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. Why was organized resistance to slavery by slaves risky?
    a. Most slaves supported slavery.
    b. Southern whites possessed overwhelming authority and firepower.
    c. Slaves were pacifists.
    d. Slaves did not possess an alternative vision of what should replace slavery.
    e. Slaves believed that disorganized resistance was far more effective.

     

     

    ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 496

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   The Prosser Conspiracy (V.F)         MSC:  Understanding

     

    1. During the nineteenth century, major slave rebellions:
    a. occurred frequently
    b. were rare
    c. were sometimes joined by poor whites
    d. had about even odds of success
    e. happened most often in the Lower South

     

     

    ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 497

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   The Prosser Conspiracy (V.F)         MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. The slave revolt led by Nat Turner:
    a. resulted in his escape to Canada
    b. was one of hundreds in American history
    c. proved the influence of abolitionists in the South
    d. was betrayed before it even got started
    e. killed more than 50 whites before its suppression

     

     

    ANS:  E                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 499

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   Nat Turner’s Rebellion (V.I)           MSC:  Remembering

     

    1. A typical form of resistance pursued by slaves entailed:
    a. outright rebellion
    b. running away
    c. suicide
    d. malingering, feigning illness, and sabotage
    e. arson

     

     

    ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 500

    OBJ:   Summarize how enslaved people responded to their bondage during the antebellum period and compare this to how free persons of color fit into southern society.

    TOP:   The Lure of Freedom (V.J)             MSC:  Remembering

     

    ESSAY

     

    1. How important was slavery to the economy of the Old South? Discuss its effects on agriculture, industry, and any other relevant aspects of the South.

     

    ANS:

    Answer will vary.

     

    1. Describe white society in the Old South. What myths have been associated with its various groups? In each case, what was the reality?

     

    ANS:

    Answer will vary.

     

    1. In what ways was southern society diverse? Explain how certain unifying factors tied the region together into what is known as “the South.”

     

    ANS:

    Answer will vary.

     

    1. What roles did religion, folklore, and family life play in the lives of slaves?

     

    ANS:

    Answer will vary.

     

    1. Discuss agricultural diversity as it relates to the Old South. Why did cotton become so important, and what significance did other crops hold for the region?

     

    ANS:

    Answer will vary.

     

    1. Discuss the concept of honor in the Old South and what role, if any, violence played in everyday society.

     

    ANS:

    Answer will vary.

     

    1. Trace the development of black society in the Old South. What were the different groups that comprised black society? What distinguished them from each other, and what tied them together?

     

    ANS:

    Answer will vary.

     

    1. How prevalent were slave rebellions in antebellum America? Detail the most significant of the nineteenth-century rebellions and explain their significance to understanding the period.

     

    ANS:

    Answer will vary.

     

    1. What made the Old Southwest different from other parts of the South? Why are those differences important to understanding the antebellum period?

     

    ANS:

    Answer will vary.

     

    MATCHING

     

    Match each description with the item below.

    a. plotted a slave revolt near Richmond in 1800
    b. was hanged for killing her master when defending herself against a sexual assault
    c. ran away from slavery in Maryland and became an outspoken critic of the institution
    d. plantation mistress who was a critic of the plantation system
    e. led a successful slave revolt on Saint-Domingue
    f. allegedly plotted slave rebellion in South Carolina
    g. free black man kidnapped and sold into slavery in the South
    h. led the largest slave revolt in American history just north of New Orleans
    i. author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin
    j. led a slave revolt in 1831 in Southampton County, Virginia

     

     

    1. Mary Chesnut

     

    1. Frederick Douglass

     

    1. Solomon Northup

     

    1. Celia

     

    1. Harriet Beecher Stowe

     

    1. Gabriel Prosser

     

    1. Charles Deslondes

     

    1. Nat Turner

     

    1. Denmark Vesey

     

    1. Toussaint L’Ouverture

     

    1. CHAPTER 19: POLITICAL STALEMATE AND RURAL REVOLT, 1865-1900TRUE/FALSE

       

      1. By 1920, more than half the U.S. population was urban.

       

      ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 849

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Urban America (I)

       

      1. The spread of mass transit was a major factor in the growth of the suburbs.

       

      ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 849

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Growth in All Directions (I.C)

       

      1. One major task in big cities was disposing of horse waste.

       

      ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 815

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   America’s Move to Town (I.B)

       

      1. Politics in the late nineteenth century was dominated by a series of strong presidents.

       

      ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 864

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:           Gilded Age Politics (IV)

       

      1. Ellis Island was built by New York City primarily to handle an influx of immigrants.

       

      ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 853

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    A Surge of Newcomers from Europe (II.A)

       

      1. The peak decade of immigration was the 1890s.

       

      ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 852

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    A Surge of Newcomers from Europe (II.A)

       

      1. When first created, the ICC was too weak to regulate the railroads effectively.

       

      ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 875

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:           Railroad Regulation (V.G)

       

      1. In major cities, politics was often a form of public entertainment.

       

      ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 857

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Cultural Life (III)

       

      1. Saloons were the poor man’s social clubs during the late nineteenth century.

       

      ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 858

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Saloons (III.A)

       

      1. Tenement housing gave city dwellers substantially healthier and more comfortable living conditions.

       

      ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 850

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Crowds, Dirt, and Disease (I.D)

       

      1. Mugwumps tended to oppose civil service reform.

       

      ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 873

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   The Campaign of 1884 (V.E)

       

      1. The Grange was the leading farm organization through the 1890s.

       

      ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 880

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   The Granger Movement (VI.B)

       

      1. Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species put forward the theory of evolution.

       

      ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 859

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   The Impact of Darwinism (III.C)

       

      1. Charles Darwin coined the phrase, “survival of the fittest.”

       

      ANS:  F                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 860

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   Social Darwinism (III.D)

       

      1. One of the biggest problems farmers faced was falling commodity prices, caused in part by overproduction.

       

      ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 879

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   Agricultural Unrest (VI.A)

       

      MULTIPLE CHOICE

       

      1. Why was the development of cast-iron and steel-frame construction techniques significant to the growth of cities?
      a. The growth of streetcars depended on such techniques.
      b. They were the primary engines of job growth.
      c. They allowed developers to erect high-rise buildings.
      d. They were invented by immigrant laborers.
      e. They demonstrated the value of female ingenuity.

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 849

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Growth in All Directions (I.C)        MSC:  Analyzing

       

      1. Which region of the United States had the greatest proportion of urban dwellers?
      a. the Northeast d. the Far West
      b. the South e. the Great Plains
      c. the middle Atlantic

       

       

      ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 849

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   America’s Move to Town (I.B)       MSC:  Applying

       

      1. One of the reasons mass transit was significant to developing cities was because:
      a. it increased the reliance on horse-drawn transportation
      b. it allowed larger numbers of people to become commuters and live away from the central city
      c. it stifled the growth of the city by drawing jobs to the periphery
      d. it prevented parks from being built inside city limits
      e. it kept the population of women living in the city very low

       

       

      ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 849

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Growth in All Directions (I.C)        MSC:  Analyzing

       

      1. By 1900, all of the following technologies had helped transform mass transit EXCEPT:
      a. subways d. gasoline-powered buses
      b. electric trolleys e. elevated trains
      c. cable cars

       

       

      ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 849

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Growth in All Directions (I.C)        MSC:  Applying

       

      1. Tenement houses in New York City:
      a. were cramped, yet offered more privacy than apartments
      b. were urban, yet their courtyards offered children a sense of nature
      c. had higher mortality rates than among the general population
      d. were clean
      e. usually had two to three families in each building

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 851

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Crowds, Dirt, and Disease (I.D)      MSC:  Applying

       

      1. William “Boss” Tweed controlled:
      a. the Populist party d. Kansas City
      b. Chicago’s South Side e. Tammany Hall
      c. the Greenback party

       

       

      ANS:  E                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 865

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Local Politics and Party Loyalists (IV.A)                         MSC:  Analyzing

       

      1. All of the following contributed to epidemics, disease, and high mortality rates in the growing cities EXCEPT:
      a. overflowing garbage
      b. untreated sewage
      c. contaminated water
      d. the banishment of animals to outside city limits
      e. overcrowding

       

       

      ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 851

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Crowds, Dirt, and Disease (I.D)      MSC:  Applying

       

      1. What do cholera, typhoid, and yellow fever all have in common?
      a. They are all water-related diseases.
      b. They are all air-related diseases.
      c. They are all sexually transmitted diseases.
      d. They are all food-related diseases.
      e. They are all genetic disorders.

       

       

      ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 851

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Crowds, Dirt, and Disease (I.D)      MSC:  Applying

       

      1. Which of the following would most likely have been a Gilded Age Democrat?
      a. a New England Protestant d. an African American
      b. a nativist e. a Union veteran
      c. an Irish immigrant

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 866

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   National Politics (IV.B)                  MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. The public health officials and municipal engineers that tried to clean up the city and its public health dangers were called:
      a. garbage men d. sanitary reformers
      b. health care professionals e. cowboys
      c. missionaries

       

       

      ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 851

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Crowds, Dirt, and Disease (I.D)      MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. The Stalwarts:
      a. were led by Roscoe Conkling
      b. generally favored a lenient southern policy
      c. were a faction in the Democratic party
      d. were also known as the Half-Breeds
      e. had opposed Ulysses S. Grant

       

       

      ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 869

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Hayes and Civil Service Reform (V.A)                           MSC:  Applying

       

      1. The Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act:
      a. provided for appointments only in the postal service
      b. was signed into law by James Garfield
      c. was vetoed as “an unconstitutional intrusion of government into the private sphere” by Benjamin Harrison
      d. set up the first racial quotas for government service jobs
      e. provided for appointment to a number of government jobs on the basis of competitive exams

       

       

      ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 872

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    The Civil Service Commission (V.D)

      MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. The reason that Chester A. Arthur did not win a second term in 1884 is that:
      a. he was elected to the presidency with less than half of the popular vote
      b. he died in office
      c. he pledged to serve only one term after replacing the assassinated James Blaine
      d. he switched parties
      e. Republican party leaders were not pleased with his first-term record and did not nominate him to run for a second term

       

       

      ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 872

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    The Campaign of 1884 (V.E)     MSC:             Analyzing

       

      1. Ellis Island was located right outside the port of:
      a. Boston d. Philadelphia
      b. San Francisco e. Charleston
      c. New York City

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 853

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    A Surge of Newcomers from Europe (II.A)

      MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. After 1890, most immigrants were:
      a. from northern and western Europe d. from Mexico
      b. from southern and eastern Europe e. members of the professional class
      c. of Teutonic and Celtic origin

       

       

      ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 853

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    A Surge of Newcomers from Europe (II.A)

      MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. The American Protective Association:
      a. was a group of pharmaceutical companies that began a sanitation campaign in New York City
      b. was mainly an anti-Semitic organization operating in the Deep South
      c. was a secret organization whose members pledged never to employ or vote for a Roman Catholic
      d. campaigned for a stronger navy from its base in the Northeast
      e. consisted almost entirely of immigrants from southern and eastern Europe who favored liberal immigration policies

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 856

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    The Nativist Response (II.B)      MSC:             Applying

       

      1. “Nativists” believed:
      a. immigration was a boon to the American economy
      b. American Indians were the preferred source of workers
      c. Chester Arthur was foreign-born and not a real U.S. citizen
      d. religion had no place in the public sphere
      e. immigrants were a threat to their jobs and way of life

       

       

      ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 854

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    The Nativist Response (II.B)      MSC:             Remembering

       

      1. During the campaign for the presidential election of 1884, many prominent Republican leaders and supporters left the party because:
      a. they would not vote for a woman as vice president
      b. the Mugwumps had gained power within the party
      c. letters were discovered linking candidate James G. Blaine to the railroads
      d. the party refused to take a firm stand on the tariff
      e. they would not vote for Grant to serve a third term

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 873

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    The Campaign of 1884 (V.E)     MSC:             Applying

       

      1. Mugwumps were centered in:
      a. the land grant colleges across the country
      b. the agricultural colleges of the South
      c. the Far West and major universities
      d. the Midwest and small colleges
      e. large cities and major universities in the Northeast

       

       

      ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 873

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    The Campaign of 1884 (V.E)     MSC:             Remembering

       

      1. The exclusion of Chinese immigrants:
      a. came only after the exclusion of immigrants from southern and eastern Europe
      b. came only after the exclusion of immigrants from northern and western Europe
      c. was opposed by white workers in the Far West
      d. was supported by President Chester Arthur
      e. originally called for a ten-year term

       

       

      ANS:  E                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 856

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    The Nativist Response (II.B)      MSC:             Applying

       

      1. Why was the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 significant in American immigration history?
      a. It sent all the Chinese immigrants in the United States back to China.
      b. It was the first federal law to restrict immigration on the basis of race and class.
      c. It was the first time Congress was unable to override a presidential veto of an immigration law.
      d. It denied citizenship to any Chinese born in the United States.
      e. It removed all restrictions from American immigration law.

       

       

      ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 856

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    The Nativist Response (II.B)      MSC:             Analyzing

       

      1. Middle- and upper-class urban families spent much of their leisure time:
      a. together at home playing games or reading books
      b. in saloons
      c. attending vaudeville shows
      d. traveling out West
      e. helping poor people

       

       

      ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Pages 856-857

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Cultural Life (III)                            MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. Why was the Interstate Commerce Commission created?
      a. to expand American exports
      b. to regulate railroads
      c. to encourage increased imports of foreign goods
      d. to boost the dairy industry
      e. to clean up corruption in politics

       

       

      ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 875

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Railroad Regulation (V.G)              MSC:  Applying

       

      1. Vaudeville shows were popular because:
      a. they included something to please every taste, social class, and type
      b. women and children were not permitted to attend them
      c. native-born Americans liked that immigrants were banned from them
      d. they were free
      e. they doubled as inexpensive daycare for the working poor

       

       

      ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 857

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Cultural Life (III)                            MSC:  Analyzing

       

      1. Around 1900, saloons did all of the following EXCEPT:
      a. offer mail services
      b. provide public restrooms for poor people
      c. serve alcohol
      d. provide refuges for the homeless
      e. serve as a great place for immigrant men to meet women

       

       

      ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 858

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Saloons (III.A)                                MSC:  Applying

       

      1. In the late nineteenth century, the least likely place you would find a woman spending her leisure time was at:
      a. the movies d. a public park
      b. a vaudeville show e. a dance hall
      c. a saloon

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 858

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Saloons (III.A)                                MSC:  Applying

       

      1. Benjamin Harrison lost the popular vote in the 1888 election. How was he able to win the presidency?
      a. Corruption by the political machines affected the outcome.
      b. His opponent died before he could take office.
      c. He ran in and won the 1892 election.
      d. He earned a majority of the electoral votes.
      e. The House of Representatives voted to overturn the election results.

       

       

      ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 876

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Tariff Reform and the Election of 1888 (V.H)                MSC:  Analyzing

       

      1. Commodity prices during the Gilded Age declined in large part because of:
      a. rampant inflation
      b. overproduction and international competition in world markets
      c. free-silver policies
      d. low American tariff rates
      e. lazy farmers

       

       

      ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 879

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Agricultural Unrest (VI.A)              MSC:  Analyzing

       

      1. The Supreme Court decision Munn v. Illinois was significant to understanding the power of government to regulate industry because:
      a. it denied the right of state and local governments to regulate industry essential to the public welfare
      b. it upheld the sweeping power of the federal government to regulate any industry in any fashion it saw fit
      c. it denied the federal government any power to regulate any industry
      d. it upheld the right of state and local governments to regulate industry essential to the public interest
      e. it decided that all government regulatory power over industry rested with city and town governments

       

       

      ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 880

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   The Granger Movement (VI.B)       MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. What distinguished the Farmers’ Alliances from the Granger movement?
      a. The Grangers focused solely on social and recreational activities, while the Alliances focused solely on political action.
      b. The Grangers supported free-silver economic policies, while the Alliances supported the gold standard.
      c. The Grangers supported low tariffs, while the Alliances supported high tariffs.
      d. The Grange was a national organization that tended to attract more prosperous farmers, while the Alliances were grass roots organizations filled with struggling farmers.
      e. The Grangers were predominantly a wing of the Democratic party while the Alliances were predominantly a wing of the Republican party.

       

       

      ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Pages 880-881

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   The Granger Movement (VI.B)       MSC:  Analyzing

       

      1. What was the purpose of the “subtreasury plan”?
      a. It promoted deflation by withdrawing silver certificates from circulation.
      b. It reestablished the gold standard.
      c. It reclaimed unused land from the railroads.
      d. It allowed farmers to secure low-interest government loans.
      e. It said that the national bank could pull supplemental cash from private banks.

       

       

      ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 882

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Farmers’ Alliances (VI.C)               MSC:  Applying

       

      1. Facing severe restrictions in their free time, married working women often:
      a. spent their days totally alone
      b. found fellowship with other women on the public streets while tending to other responsibilities
      c. divorced their husbands and abandoned their children
      d. ran for political office to change the laws that hurt them
      e. settled for having pets

       

       

      ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 858

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Leisure for Women (III.B)              MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. Young, urban women eager for recreation frequented all of the following EXCEPT:
      a. dance halls d. picnic grounds
      b. theaters e. boxing matches
      c. amusement parks

       

       

      ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 858

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   Leisure for Women (III.B)              MSC:  Analyzing

       

      1. Mary Elizabeth Lease:
      a. founded the Patrons of Husbandry (the Grange)
      b. was the presidential candidate of the Greenback party in 1892
      c. was a Kansas Alliance leader
      d. wrote the 1892 Omaha platform for the People’s party
      e. was the lone female leader in the Stalwart movement

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 883

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   New Third Parties (VI.D)                MSC:  Analyzing

       

      1. During the presidential election of 1892, the Populist candidate James B. Weaver:
      a. campaigned against a “progressive” income tax
      b. discovered the cure for malaria
      c. won Colorado, Kansas, Nevada, and Idaho
      d. was elected vice president
      e. was the only presidential candidate to be raised in Iowa

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 884

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   The Election of 1892 (VI.E)           MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. One of the causes of the 1893 depression was failure of:
      a. the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad
      b. the stock market
      c. the commodity price index
      d. housing starts in 1891 and 1892
      e. President Cleveland to regulate the railroads

       

       

      ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 885

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   The Depression of 1893 and the “Free Silver” Crusade (VI.F)

      MSC:  Applying

       

      1. During the depression of 1893, unemployment hovered around:
      a. every industry, particularly construction
      b. twenty percent
      c. fifty percent
      d. as high as seventy-five percent in New York
      e. manufacturing jobs, but not the service sector

       

       

      ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 885

      OBJ:   Identify new forms of mass entertainment that emerged by 1900.

      TOP:   The Depression of 1893 and the “Free Silver” Crusade (VI.F)

      MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. Following the 1893 depression, Coxey’s Army:
      a. demanded government jobs for the unemployed
      b. organized a massive protest march down Wall Street
      c. tried to overthrow the government
      d. carried Cleveland into the White House
      e. was led by a poor, broken farmer from Iowa

       

       

      ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 886

      OBJ:   Explain the ways that the “new immigration” changed  America at the end of the nineteenth century. TOP:    The Depression of 1893 and the “Free Silver” Crusade (VI.F)

      MSC:  Applying

       

      1. “You shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold!” This statement was made by:
      a. William McKinley d. Thomas E. Watson
      b. William Jennings Bryan e. William Henry Harrison
      c. Grover Cleveland

       

       

      ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 888

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   William Jennings Bryan (VI.H)      MSC:  Analyzing

       

      1. During the 1896 campaign, William Jennings Bryan:
      a. promised to continue the policies of Grover Cleveland
      b. tried to de-emphasize his platform’s demand for free silver
      c. spoke and campaigned all over the country
      d. refused to mix politics and religion
      e. ran what journalists called a “front-porch campaign”

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 889

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   The Election of 1896 (VI.I)            MSC:  Applying

       

      1. One of the main reasons McKinley defeated Bryan in the election of 1896 was that:
      a. Bryan could not win the support of rural America
      b. Bryan was a terrible orator who bored his audience with his speeches
      c. Bryan’s “front-porch campaign” alienated many voters
      d. Bryan got little support from factory workers in the cities
      e. the Populists refused to support his candidacy

       

       

      ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 891

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   The Election of 1896 (VI.I)            MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. Social Darwinism implied the need for:
      a. strong central government
      b. forced natural selection
      c. competition for dominance between different social groups
      d. hands off, laissez-faire government policy
      e. racial equality

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 861

      OBJ:   Determine the factors that accounted for urbanization in America.

      TOP:   Social Darwinism (III.D)                MSC:  Applying

       

      1. Popular Science Monthly, founded in 1872, became the chief magazine for promoting:
      a. the Academy of American Science d. The Progressive party
      b. the Republican party e. social Darwinism
      c. The Greenback party

       

       

      ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 861

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   Social Darwinism (III.D)                MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. Herbert Spencer:
      a. coined the phrase “survival of the fittest”
      b. was the influential president of Harvard University
      c. invented the modern game of basketball
      d. was the first person to earn a PhD from an American university
      e. cowrote On the Origin of Species with Charles Darwin

       

       

      ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 860

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   Social Darwinism (III.D)                MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. “Equal rights to all, special privileges to none” was the slogan of the:
      a. Farmers’ Alliance d. Republicans
      b. Democrats e. Greenback party
      c. Southern Alliance

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 883

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   Farmers’ Alliances (VI.C)               MSC:  Applying

       

      1. William Graham Sumner:
      a. wrote “The Gospel of Wealth,” a social Darwinist justification for accumulated wealth
      b. was one of the most outspoken opponents of Darwinism in America
      c. argued in his book Folkways that it was a mistake for the government to interfere with established customs
      d. wrote System of Synthetic Philosophy
      e. preached that the law of God and the laws of nature were one and the same

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 861

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   Social Darwinism (III.D)                MSC:  Remembering

       

      1. The main idea of reform Darwinism was that:
      a. humans, made in the image of God, should not be included among the animals when discussing Darwinism
      b. government should not interfere with business
      c. cooperation, not competition, would best promote progress
      d. man continued to evolve according to Darwin’s principles of natural selection
      e. for society to truly reform, any “imitation” of welfare must cease

       

       

      ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 861

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   Reform Darwinism (III.E)              MSC:  Applying

       

      1. Realists’ emphasis on closely observing everyday life grew out of:
      a. transcendentalism d. socialism
      b. reform Darwinism e. the scientific spirit
      c. social Darwinism

       

       

      ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 863

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   Realism in Literature and Art (III.F)                                           MSC:   Applying

       

      1. Why was Lester Frank Ward’s Dynamic Sociology considered a challenge to William Graham Sumner’s “social Darwinism”?
      a. Ward embraced “survival of the fittest,” while Sumner embraced “survival of the smartest.”
      b. Ward believed that humans had no control over their destiny, while Sumner argued the opposite.
      c. Ward denied the existence of evolution, while social Darwinism was based entirely on the scientific theory of evolution.
      d. Ward argued that cooperation among people better promoted progress, while Sumner believed in competition.
      e. Ward was a Democrat, and Sumner was a Republican.

       

       

      ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 861

      OBJ:   Understand the impact of Darwinian thought on the social sciences.

      TOP:   Reform Darwinism (III.E)              MSC:  Analyzing

       

      ESSAY

       

      1. How did immigration to America change in the latter half of the nineteenth century, and what was the response to that change?

       

      ANS:

      Answer will vary.

       

      1. Compare social Darwinism and reform Darwinism. What were the basic assumptions of each movement?

       

      ANS:

      Answer will vary.

       

      1. Describe the explosive growth of urbanization in the late nineteenth century. What factors led to this growth, and where did the largest growth take place?

       

      ANS:

      Answer will vary.

       

      1. Describe politics in the Gilded Age. What were the main issues? What factors influenced voters to be either Republican or Democrat?

       

      ANS:

      Answer will vary.

       

      1. By the end of the Gilded Age, the values of a metropolitan and industrial America had triumphed over those of a rural and agrarian America. What evidence supports this statement?

       

      ANS:

      Answer will vary.

       

      1. Describe how living in an urban environment impacted women’s lives.

       

      ANS:

      Answer will vary.

       

      1. Discuss the most serious public health challenges the urban population faced, how those challenges were addressed, and how effective the solutions were.

       

      ANS:

      Answer will vary.

       

      1. Trace the issues and events surrounding the election of 1888. How was it that the person who won the popular vote still lost the election?

       

      ANS:

      Answer will vary.

       

      1. Discuss the status of the American economy as the nineteenth century came to an end. Be sure to include the issues of currency and the tension between the silverites and the goldbugs.

       

      ANS:

      Answer will vary.

       

      MATCHING

       

      Match each description with the item below.

      a. chief spokesperson for reform Darwinism
      b. wrote On the Origin of Species
      c. Republican leader of the “Half-Breeds”
      d. devised the subtreasury plan
      e. wrote Folkways
      f. Democratic presidential candidate in 1896
      g. vetoed the Chinese Exclusion Act before it was overridden by Congress
      h. led march on Washington, D.C., to demand that the federal government provide jobs for the unemployed
      i. founded the Grange
      j. McKinley’s campaign manager

       

       

      1. William Jennings Bryan

       

      1. Oliver H. Kelley

       

      1. James G. Blaine

       

      1. Chester Arthur

       

      1. Jacob S. Coxey

       

      1. Mark Hanna

       

      1. William Graham Sumner

       

      1. Charles Darwin

       

      1. Charles W. Macune

       

      1. Lester Frank Ward