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Therapeutic Communications for Health Care 3rd Edition ByTamparo Lindh – TEST BANK

 

Chapter 3: The Helping Interview

 

MODIFIED TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. Control is a critical factor in the helping interview. Even using patient or client implies superior/inferior, higher/lower, more-knowledge/less-knowledge. _________________________

 

ANS:  F, patient (not client)

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Your personal appearance and the appearance of the medical office are vital keys in the helping interview. _________________________

 

ANS:  T                                                     PTS:   1

 

  1. When meeting clients for the first time, it is best to address them informally by their first names to lessen their anxiety. ________________________________________

 

ANS:  F, formally by their last name

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. In the helping interview, during resolution, allow time for the client to think about what has just been said and to formulate any questions. _________________________

 

ANS:  T                                                     PTS:   1

 

  1. During the orientation phase of the helping interview, it is best for the client to be standing when the health professional is seated. _________________________

 

ANS:  F, seated

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. It is advisable to make “small talk” when leading the client from the reception area to the exam room. _________________________

 

ANS:  T                                                     PTS:   1

 

  1. In the helping interview, genuineness means that there will be congruency between the verbal and nonverbal messages. _________________________

 

ANS:  T                                                     PTS:   1

 

  1. “Tell me about a typical day with your baby” is an example of an indirect statement. _________________________

 

ANS:  T                                                     PTS:   1

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. In the helping interview, the person needing help (vs. the person giving help) feels
a. powerful d. gratified
b. frightened or embarrassed e. b and c
c. sad or angry

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1

 

  1. The orientation component of the helping interview involves
a. very little preparation on the part of the health professional
b. only the client and health professional
c. empathy, not sympathy
d. more risk for the client than the health professional
e. none of the above

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1

 

  1. The clients says, “I cannot control my disease!” The health professional responds, “How is your mother doing?” This is an example of what roadblock?
a. defending c. reassuring cliche
b. shifting d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1

 

  1. In levels of need, if the client seems panicked, it means that the
a. health care professional should talk more rapidly
b. client does not listen
c. client expects professional to help
d. health care professional must supply advice

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1

 

  1. The following is a closed question.
a. “When you move your foot, does it hurt?”
b. “What foods cause your indigestion?”
c. “When do you experience pain?
d. “What actions bring on your productive cough?”

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1

 

  1. Statement(s) that is/are a roadblock(s) to communication include(s)
a. Patting the client on the arm saying, “Everything will be OK after the doctor sees you.”
b. “You couldn’t be sweating that much!”
c. “Why did you do that to your daughter?”
d. “If I were you, I’d just forget about the death of your spouse if it’s so painful.”
e. all of the above

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1

 

  1. The following statement is moralizing/lecturing.
a. “I’d never say that to you.”
b. “Why can’t you just follow the doctor’s orders?”
c. “You really ought to have done it this way.”
d. “I just know it’ll get better for you.”

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1

 

MATCHING

 

Match each item with the correct statement below.

Levels of need

a. Predicament e. Shock
b. Panic f. Problem
c. Crisis g. Orientation
d. Identification

 

 

  1. A numbed or dazed condition

 

  1. No easy solution

 

  1. Has a solution

 

  1. A state of fear

 

  1. A very large predicament; short term

 

  1. ANS:  E                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  A                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  F                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  B                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  C                    PTS:   1

 

Match each item with the correct statement below.

Responding skills

a. Acknowledging feelings c. Reflecting and paraphrasing
b. Clarifying and validating d. Sharing observation

 

 

  1. “So you think milk and cheese cause gas for you?”

 

  1. “That must be frustrating for you.”

 

  1. “When you say that do you mean…?”

 

  1. “Your hands are shaking.”

 

  1. ANS:  C                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  A                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  B                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  D                    PTS:   1

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. List two changes in today’s health care climate that might affect the helping interview.

 

ANS:

Any two of the three; in any order:

1. Clients visit their health care provider much more informed than ever before.
2. Clients may find their continuity of care interrupted by their employer’s choices of health care plans, which can force a change in providers.
3. The availability and use of the Internet has increased, allowing clients more health care information, and they realize their health care choices.

 

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Give two examples of defending, one of the roadblocks to communication.

 

ANS:

Answers vary; in any order. Suggested responses:

 

  1. “I wouldn’t ever have said that to you.”
  2. “We just don’t do that at this clinic.”
  3. “I can’t believe we’d tell you to go there.”

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Give two examples of shaming or threatening statements and/or actions that are roadblocks to communication.

 

ANS:

Answers will vary but sample responses might include, in any order:

1. The health professional laughs at a serious statement made by the client.
2. “I didn’t mean to say that to you. Don’t you dare tell the physician I said it—or else!”
3. The client cries when telling about her husband’s death and the health professional responds, “Well, you don’t have to cry about it now. It’s been 5 months!”

 

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. What are some actions that health professionals can take to look professional and “dress the part”?

 

ANS:

Answers will vary but sample responses might include, in any order:

 

A daily bath

An effective deodorant

Clean hair, off the collar, and out of the face

Trimmed and manicured nails; clear polish only

Properly fitting uniform

Wear name tag

Limited jewelry; post earrings only

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Explain the difference between sympathy and empathy.

 

ANS:

Sympathy is to respond to the emotional sate of clients and to acknowledge the feelings they express.

 

Empathy is the ability to accept the client’s private world as if it were your own.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. How might a health professional respond when a client asks during the resolution phase of the helping interview, “How much time will it take for the physician to treat my diabetes?”

 

ANS:

Answers will vary but sample responses might include, in any order:

 

“Diabetes is a chronic disease that will require ongoing treatment, but with your physician working with you, it will become easier for you to live with the disease.”

 

“We will help you understand your body’s responses to your medication, your food intake, and your exercise program.”

 

“There are diabetic support groups that some of our clients have found very helpful. Would you like a list of them?”

 

PTS:   1